extracts

This is a collection of things that are wonderful.

tinatianphotography.com
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"The ultimate April Fools’ joke was to launch something kind of crazy on April 1st and have it still exist on April 2nd.”
Happy 10th anniversary!

"The ultimate April Fools’ joke was to launch something kind of crazy on April 1st and have it still exist on April 2nd.”

Happy 10th anniversary!

LOL nice job, Google.

LOL nice job, Google.

humansofnewyork:

"I don’t understand my feelings. Sometimes I feel sad and I don’t know why. Then sometimes I feel silly, and I don’t know why either. Now I feel ‘wow,’ because this is my very first interview."

humansofnewyork:

"I don’t understand my feelings. Sometimes I feel sad and I don’t know why. Then sometimes I feel silly, and I don’t know why either. Now I feel ‘wow,’ because this is my very first interview."

newyorker:

In light of Facebook’s acquisition of Oculus, a maker of virtual-reality hardware, Vauhini Vara explores how the company plans to sell you on the new technology: http://nyr.kr/1rzzueJ

“Zuckerberg writes about how ‘you’ might use Oculus: to attend a sporting event, learn alongside classmates, or visit with your doctor. (He uses the word ‘you’ seven times in his blog post.) These examples—carefully chosen, no doubt—make the case that virtual-reality hardware can make you feel more ‘present’ in your relationships, rather than alienating you from them.”

Photograph by Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images.

newyorker:

In light of Facebook’s acquisition of Oculus, a maker of virtual-reality hardware, Vauhini Vara explores how the company plans to sell you on the new technology: http://nyr.kr/1rzzueJ

“Zuckerberg writes about how ‘you’ might use Oculus: to attend a sporting event, learn alongside classmates, or visit with your doctor. (He uses the word ‘you’ seven times in his blog post.) These examples—carefully chosen, no doubt—make the case that virtual-reality hardware can make you feel more ‘present’ in your relationships, rather than alienating you from them.”

Photograph by Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images.

(Source: newyorker.com)

"When you talk about the design of Haas Neue Grotesk or Helvetic, what it’s all about is the interrelationship of the negative shape, the figure-ground relationship, the shapes between characters and within characters, with the black, if you like, with the inked surface. And the Swiss pay more attention to the background, so that the counters and the space between characters just hold the letters. I mean you can’t imagine anything moving; it is so firm. It not a letter that bent to shape; it’s a letter that lives in a powerful matrix of surrounding space. It’s… oh, it’s brilliant when it’s done well." 
- Mike Parker, Helvetica

"When you talk about the design of Haas Neue Grotesk or Helvetic, what it’s all about is the interrelationship of the negative shape, the figure-ground relationship, the shapes between characters and within characters, with the black, if you like, with the inked surface. And the Swiss pay more attention to the background, so that the counters and the space between characters just hold the letters. I mean you can’t imagine anything moving; it is so firm. It not a letter that bent to shape; it’s a letter that lives in a powerful matrix of surrounding space. It’s… oh, it’s brilliant when it’s done well." 

- Mike Parker, Helvetica

Steve and I spent months and months working on a part of a product that, often, nobody would ever see, nor realize was there. It didn’t make any difference functionally. We did it because we cared, because when you realize how well you can make something, falling short, whether seen or not, feels like failure.

—Jony Ive, talking about building Apple products with Steve Jobs during a long sit-down with John Arlidge. (via parislemon)

I can finally sleep now.

I can finally sleep now.